Jarvis Chow, World Traveler

Can you really travel the world?

Learn more about his financial planning strategy.


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Jarvis Chow, World Traveler

Can you really travel the world?

Learn more about his financial planning strategy.

Case Studies

The stories of the world traveler reveal ordinary people’s not-so-ordinary financial planning insights.

Quit to travel

Financial reserves for a career break


Mandy, 34 years old
Mandy is a civil servant, and plans to quit her job for a one-year career break and travel to New Zealand to broaden her horizons.

  • Read the story

    A stable career without challenges?

    Mandy started working in a government post ten years ago, and soon found the job dull and repetitive. Still young and energetic, Mandy finally decided to leave her comfort zone and resigned from her current job. She now wants to travel to New Zealand for a career break, which hopefully will allow her to contemplate on her future, broaden her horizons and experience something different. She also hopes to find a new direction and acquire new knowledge during the trip.

    Financial planning for a one -year career break

    Young people trying to understand themselves better through a career break need to consider the feasibility first, as money and responsibilities are the basic concerns.


    Mandy is the youngest child in the family, so she does not take on much of the family’s burdens. Yet she has to support herself overseas. In response to future uncertainties, such as employment and economic environment, she needs an adequate reserve to cope with the daily and medical expenses in the coming year, and to cover the expenses after she comes home.


    She believes that she can support herself during her travel and won’t need an extra reserve for that, so she plans to use her current savings to cover future needs, mainly medical protection, family support and expenses incurred during job seeking afterwards.


    To cover the living expenses before she finds a new job, Mandy may consider setting aside a reserve enough for six months’ living. As she lives with her family, her basic monthly expenses is around HK5,000, so a total of HK$30,000 will be enough. Meanwhile, she also considers buying a suitable health insurance policy to cope with the potential medical expenses at different life stages.


    Appreciating her parents’ love and care, she would like to make sure that her parents will be taken care of in case of any mishap. Therefore, she plans to buy a life insurance plan when she returns and finds a new job. Besides, she may also consider a life protection plan with a savings element to enjoy lifelong coverage and accumulate cash value and non-guaranteed dividend at the same time.


    In case Mandy is not able to take care of her parents, who are now in their early sixties, in the next 30 years due to accident, illness or death, they would need HK$3,600,000 in the next three decades based on their current monthly expense of HK$10,000 excluding inflation and other emergency expenses. Mandy therefore may consider buying a life insurance plan with a coverage of HK$3,600,000. In other words, deducting the six-month living expenses, and the medical and life insurance premiums for two years, she may put her remaining savings into a savings plan to support her future life and career development.


    Special thanks to the case study provider: Alvin Lam, Certified Money Coach (CMC)®
















    The information above is for general reference only. It shall not constitute nor shall it be taken as a substitute for the professional advice from an insurance advisor on the purchase of insurance policies. No aspect of this website shall be solely relied upon for the decision of insurance purchase. You should seek relevant professional advice before taking action on any matters to which information provided on this website may be relevant. For more details, please contact your Manulife insurance advisor or call our customer service hotline on (852) 2510 3383 (if you are in Hong Kong) or (853) 8398 0383 (if you are in Macau).


Addicted to travel

How many trips a year?


Murphy, 32 years old
Murphy is single, and works as the marketing manager of a travel agency. Passionate about travelling, he usually goes on three to four short trips and one long trip every year. He works hard every day to secure a stable income and wants to maintain this lifestyle in the future.

  • Read the story

    Life on the go

    Murphy believes in the saying, “he who travels far, knows much”, and takes several trips every year. He lives a frugal life and saves as much as he can to fund his trips. In his early thirties, Murphy doesn’t plan to buy his own flat. He just wants to stay healthy so that he can keep exploring the world for decades to come.


    Travelling may be an indispensable part of life for many, but our expectations may change at different stages of life. Young people love exciting adventures that show them new custom and cultures; married couples may just want a romantic trip; parents need to take their children with them in a family trip; and senior travellers just need a relaxing trip.

    How to plan for an adventurous lifestyle?

    Expenses will vary with different travel styles. If Murphy sees travelling as his biggest goal, he will need a special reserve for every life stage. Therefore, apart from the capital need of his next trip, he also has to save for his future trips to ensure that he always has a good array of choices.


    Therefore, Murphy may consider saving regularly with a medium to long term life protection plan with a savings element. The accumulated value can be withdrawn partially to fund an affordable trip so that the balance can continue to accumulate with interests. For a costlier trip, he can withdraw the value fully, enjoying more flexibility. When he embarks on a new life journey, such as starting a family or retirement, he may keep accumulating the policy value with interests for future needs, and make use of the compounding effect to grow his savings.


    Meanwhile, it takes a healthy body to explore the world, so Murphy should also consider buying a suitable health insurance plan to cover future medical expenses.


    Special thanks to the case study provider: Alvin Lam, Certified Money Coach (CMC)®
















    The information above is for general reference only. It shall not constitute nor shall it be taken as a substitute for the professional advice from an insurance advisor on the purchase of insurance policies. No aspect of this website shall be solely relied upon for the decision of insurance purchase. You should seek relevant professional advice before taking action on any matters to which information provided on this website may be relevant. For more details, please contact your Manulife insurance advisor or call our customer service hotline on (852) 2510 3383 (if you are in Hong Kong) or (853) 8398 0383 (if you are in Macau).


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